“Seven Pale Pink Tulips” ©Jill Rosoff 2010, 17 1/2″ x 6″  $145.00

It’s bulb-planting season, and its certainly been cold enough lately here, almost as cold as it’s supposed to be according to the Dutch.  I planted bulbs years ago when I lived in Berkeley, and I’m glad that I tried it, went through the whole process, and thoroughly enjoyed keeping vigil until  the plants popped out of the ground, and then watching as they bloomed  into those long, lovely, statuesque flowers.  I marvel at those who plant and nurture their bulbs every year in SoCal.

I did a painting similar to this one earlier this year, but the one just wasn’t enough.  I felt the need to explore more the shapes of the flowers and the leaves, the colors, and how those elements work in the long, narrow format of the paper.

Mexican tulip poppies

September 23, 2010

“Mexican tulip poppies” ©Jill Rosoff 2010, 6″ x 12″, $95.00

I was invited by one of my watercolor student’s over to her home to see these flowers growing in her garden, so of course I was intrigued.  I popped over the other day, since she lives just a few blocks from me.  These plants are definately in the poppy family, the petals are very similar to Icelands, but there are eight petals, instead of just four, and the blossoms are a little smaller.  The leaves and seed pods are like elongated versions of those on the California poppy.

I find yellow challenging to paint with, especially when its the first color element on the paper.   Yellow is a light, light color, it contrasts very little to the white of the paper.  It strains the old eyeballs.  So my challenge is twofold, to find enough contrasting elements in the subject to be able to show the texture of the blossoms petals, and to set it off with a background that activates the dominant yellow color.  I like the coral on this one.  I hope the seeds propagate!  Thanks, Lea!

Dreaming of Spring

January 15, 2009

single-orange-tulip2

“Single Orange Tulip” ©Jill Rosoff 2007, 6″ x 4″, $65.00

The days are starting to get longer.  This time of year starts me thinking of spring flowers, especially bulbs.  Tulips. This one is a study of a single tulip flower, of the inside, the stamens and the pistil.  I used a favorite color combination again–see the tulips in the column on the right.  The deep purply grey background makes the orange light up.  

Off to do the Art Under the Umbrellas show in La Quinta on January 17th.  In Old Town La Quinta:  www. lqaf.com

Tiptoe through. . .

August 15, 2008

“Graphic Tulips”, ©Jill Rosoff 2007, watercolor on paper, 5 1/2″ x 8 1/2″, SOLD

I started painting tulips when I first started painting watercolors and they are a theme I go back to every now and then, as a sort of a touchstone.  I started painting them after going on a 2-month college tour of Europe, visiting almost every Western European country.  It also included Yugoslavia and Czeckoslovakia, so it was before the Iron Curtain came down.   I saw the Berlin Wall, and went through Checkpoint Charlie to East Berlin.  Spooky!  A good story, another time.

Our last stop on the continent was Holland, where I bought a packet of tulip bulbs in mixed colors.  They were shipped to me in Berkeley later on that fall, around planting time.  So, city girl that I am, I prepared the ground and planted the bulbs.  And waited and waited.  At last in March they bloomed, gloriously, so of course I did a painting of them.  Well, I did a few of them.  I recently unearthed that first painting and put it up in the studio for awhile.

So doing this piece was a revisiting of an old friend.  I was trying out a different “take” on these lovely blossoms, a more graphic rather than realistic visual.  I wish bulbs were easier to grow in So. Cal!

Use the pop up windows to view the paintings in a larger format–the colors are truer there!

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