Busy Busy Busy

May 1, 2013

I’m getting ready for shows and events in May and June here in Southern California.

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Next weekend, May 11th and 12th, I’ll be showing my hand-painted silk scarves at Unique LA.  This local artisan made show will be at the California Market Center in their Penthouse.  The show is open from 11-6 both days, my location is T106, not far from the coffee bar (you’d think they’ve met me!).  

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Bring your Moms for Mother’s Day!  AND, if you print out and bring this blog post you’ll receive 10% off the price of any scarf (retail sales only).  

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The following weekend, on May 19th, I’ll be showing for my 5th time at the terrific Balboa Island Art Walk.

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This is the Art Walk’s 19th year, and there are more artists than ever showing their work.  I will once again be located between Coral and Apolena Streets, just look for my apple-green umbrellas.  The show is strung all along Balboa Island’s bayfront walk, overlooking lovely Newport Harbor, from Marine Avenue past the Ferry Landing.  The Art Walk lasts from 9 am to 5 pm.    

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMy display at the 2012 Balboa Island Art Walk

I hope to see you at one or both events!  Thanks!

How Do You Paint a Tree?

April 18, 2013

Tuscan Hillside

“Tuscan Hillside” ©Jill Rosoff 2012, 9″ x 12″

Imagine how funny it was that this question came up in two different workshops, two completely different groups of people.  We were working on how to paint landscapes in each session, so it’s not a complete surprise.  I love that it did, and it also made me a little curious.  Is painting a tree a paint-by-numbers proposition?  Nope.  The starting point is: lets take a look at the kind of tree you want to paint.  

“Trees have a spirit and personality; none of them are the same.”  Trees come in all shapes, sizes and colors.  The trunks of trees can be all ranges of browns, greys, even green, blue or, as in fruit trees, burgundy.  The leaves are any and all shades of green, with touches of all the other colors used to create contrasts.  The fun here is the learning, observing:  first figuring out what the tree’s shape is, and then deciding how to put it down on the paper.  Is the trunk the more visually interesting element?  Or the way the crown of the tree is shaped?  In watercolor, you put down the lighter elements, then build in the darker, more richly colored ones.  Because, as always, in watercolor you paint light to dark.  The other trees also punctuate, more because they are a textural contrast to the stripes I used in the patchwork of fields.

In the painting above, the trees, especially the pencil cypresses, act like punctuation marks, creating small points of contrast, which keeps the rest of the rich colors from sort of going flat.  Put a finger up and block out the cypress trees and you’ll see what I mean.

Or look at this painting done by a fellow watercolorist/shopowner on Etsy, JC Strong.  You know its a tree, but it’s a deftly shaped tree silhouette of lovely combinations of purples and greens.  

I read this quote the other day on Facebook:  “The best teachers are those who show you where to look, but don’t tell you what to see.”  When I teach my job is to lead people down the path to explore, look and learn by observation.  There’s no one formula.  

See my work on my website, and in my Etsy shops for my paintings and my scarves.

Leaves, wet-in-wet

November 12, 2012

 

“Leaves, wet in wet, purples” ©Jill Rosoff 2012.  12″ h x 6″ w

This painting came out of a demonstration I wanted to do for my watercolor workshops exploring wet-in-wet and dropping in color.  It was also to show the physical properties of water in watercolor, and how it can be used, exploited, but also how it can be a great tool.   I lightly sketched the leaf shapes onto the paper first.  Then one by one, I painted each leaf in clear water, then dropped color into the wet areas with strong watercolors, diluted enough to make the paint liquid but to hold on to the intensity of the color.  As each drop of color spread out when it hit the wet paper, I dropped more color into the tips and the stem to hold on to that intensity of color.  It was lots of fun to do, but what was truly fun was watching my students observe what the paint does as the water dries.  

This piece is now for sale via my shop on Etsy.  If you’re looking for holiday gift ideas, you can now purchase a gift card for my shop on Etsy and let the person your giving the gift to choose what they want!

“Still Life in Yellows” ©Jill Rosoff 2012  5 1/2″ x 8 1/2″

Today I set aside just to make art.  And I cooked a little too, which sort of counts, cooking is also about making something.  But primarily I worked on art, with “soundtrack” of the Olympics playing in the background.  No business, no marketing, just all drawing and painting.  

One of the things I did today is that I finished this small painting.  I started it in June as a demonstration in one of my workshops, I wanted to play with the idea of all the objects in the painting being variations of a single color, like a one note melody:  sing “Long Tall Sally” to yourself, see what I mean?   On this one day we had all these yellow objects that people had brought in to the workshop  to use as subjects for their paintings.  The idea literally presented itself, right there in front of me, to make a composition of the different colors of yellow.  So I blocked in the pepper, the lemons and the bananas.  Then I rendered them using glazes and dropping-in color, which is also referred to as ‘charging’ (ok, a vision of the battles in the movie ‘Braveheart’ just came to mind as I wrote that–this is the way my brain works).

I decided to complete it using versions of primary colors–there were the three yellows: rich warm, bright and cool, and a little lighter and muted, plus a warm violet as the blue for all the shadows and the background, and a diluted Winsor Red became a warm pink, which also turned orangy glazed over the yellow.  Oh and a bit of green for the pepper’s stem, and on the bananas.  The fun result is that even with those few colors, it’s a pretty rich palette.  

Its available for purchase on my Etsy shop.  

Scarfing Up

March 7, 2012

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Mostly Lavender Poppies, habotai silk scarf, 8″ x 56″.  ©Jill Rosoff 2012

Both last weekend and this coming weekend I’m showing at the Art in the Park portion of Dana Point’s annual Festival of the Whales.  This is another one of my new colorways in my new collection of scarves.  If you couldn’t make it last weekend, come on down this weekend.  The Art in the Park is at the corner of Dana Point Harbor Drive, and Island way.  I’m on the grass on the south side, look for my apple-green umbrellas!  I also have my original watercolors, notecard sets, and my new reproductions available.

Want to see more of the scarves?  You can find them (and buy them too!) in my Etsy store.  New ones are going up all the time!

Blooming on silk

March 2, 2012

Pink poppies on habotai, Flower Fields on crepe de chine, Yellow Poppies on chiffon, Large Orange poppies on habotai, and Blue Poppies on crepe square.

Here’s a selection of the new scarves I’ve been making.  The theme is poppies, and I’m playing around with the sizes of the blossom and also the colors.  I also have them in red, tangerine, lavender, purple, and combinations of red and orange, yellow and orange, and red and pink.  So far, that is.  I’m painting these on three different silk fabrics:  habotai, crepe de chine, and chiffon.  The oblong scarves come in three sizes, and I have 44″ square scarves too.  The procion dyes are set so that they bond with the silk fibers, so the color is permanent.  If you see a color you like but want a different size or material than what is currently available, contact me to order the scarf you want.

I’ll be showing them this weekend and next at the Art in the Park section of the 41st annual Festival of the Whales, in Dana Point, California.  Dates are March 3, 4, 10 and 11, from 9:30 am to 5 pm.   Art in the Park will be on the grass areas at the corner of Dana Point Harbor Drive and Island Drive.  A shuttle bus that will be running, and Art in the Park is at stop #E12 on the attached map.  I’ll have my notecards, reproductions and small, matted watercolors with me too!  We’ll be having a whale of a time!

Can’t make it this weekend or next?  You can order the scarves through my shop on Etsy:  Rosoff Artworks.  And of course if you have questions, use the comment button below (all inquiries remain private), or convo me from my Etsy shop.  

New production is blooming

February 23, 2012


Scarves in process, February  ©Jill Rosoff 2012

I’ve been doing a lot of marketing work lately, one result of which is that I haven’t been painting much lately.  And I miss it!  But I’ve had a lot to do both in the marketing and in my art projects.

One project is my hand-painted silk scarves.  I paint them with permanent dye, right on to the silk fabric.  I’ve been in production, developing the designs, and getting ready to show them at a few shows in the upcoming months.  My next show is the Festival of the Whales in Dana Point, CA, at the Art in the Park section of the Festival.  For the first 2 weekends of March each year, Dana Point celebrates the return of the once-endangered California Gray Whale with “a leviathan-size event”.  I spent my teen years near here, I learned to sail sabots in Dana Point Harbor, so it’s a bit of home turf for me.

Back to the scarves.  The photo above is from my production day yesterday.  The scarves are pinned onto canvas on the painting table, where I then paint them with the dyes.  You can see the vestiges of previous dyeing under the scarves.  These are just 2 of the new crop of poppy scarves, all of which signed and numbered, and which I will be showing at the Festival of the Whales.  Come see what they look like on!  My booth will be at Art in the Park at the Festival, located at the intersection of Dana Point Harbor Drive and Island Drive.  It’s at stop E12 on the shuttle route, which you will find on this map.  Look for my apple-green market umbrellas.

If you aren’t anywhere near Dana Point and are unable come to the Festival, the scarves are currently available in my Etsy store, where I’ll be posting the new ones as soon as they’re completed and photographed.  And for those in and around north Orange County, they are now also at the Muckenthaler Cultural Center‘s gift shop, in Fullerton, CA.

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