Spring is A-Coming

January 19, 2014

Tulips (bonanza)

“Tulips (Bonanza)” ©Jill Rosoff 1992  40″ x 60″

I love painting spring flowers.  I paint them in watercolor, I paint them on my silk scarves.  Is it the colors?  The shapes?  That they make me happy?  Yes, yes and yes.  I just can’t get enough.  I walked into my local Trader Joe’s the other day, and saw the first spring tulips in the flower bins.  So I bought a bunch.  No hesitation, just leaned down and picked the color that was hollering “pick me!” at me.  They were orange with dark orange infusing from the lower part of the petals to the tips.

Now, it’s been hot in Southern California the past few days, and those buds drank a lot of water.  So they were buds on day 1, fully developed flowers on day 2, and wild things on day 3.  They were starting to droop because of the heat.  I refilled the vase, and on day 4, they were upright again.  I know they only last a week, but oh how I enjoy them.

My watercolor workshops are starting up again in 2 weeks.  My Saturday morning workshops start on Feb. 1st.   I also have two 6-session workshops scheduled at Orange Coast College Community Education, “Flowers in Watercolors” starts February 5th, and “Watercolor Still Lifes” starts March 19th.  As much as we’ll concentrate on watercolor technique, we’ll also focus on how to analyze the subject to be able to build a composition using the watercolors to their best effect.

The painting above was painted in 1992.  It lived in a restaurant in St. Helena, CA for 8 years, and now hangs in my living room.  The size noted above is the paper size, it’s framed in a simple dark wood frame, and floats on a linen background, so it’s even larger.  A  wonderful large art presence in the room.

 

Leaves, wet-in-wet

November 12, 2012

 

“Leaves, wet in wet, purples” ©Jill Rosoff 2012.  12″ h x 6″ w

This painting came out of a demonstration I wanted to do for my watercolor workshops exploring wet-in-wet and dropping in color.  It was also to show the physical properties of water in watercolor, and how it can be used, exploited, but also how it can be a great tool.   I lightly sketched the leaf shapes onto the paper first.  Then one by one, I painted each leaf in clear water, then dropped color into the wet areas with strong watercolors, diluted enough to make the paint liquid but to hold on to the intensity of the color.  As each drop of color spread out when it hit the wet paper, I dropped more color into the tips and the stem to hold on to that intensity of color.  It was lots of fun to do, but what was truly fun was watching my students observe what the paint does as the water dries.  

This piece is now for sale via my shop on Etsy.  If you’re looking for holiday gift ideas, you can now purchase a gift card for my shop on Etsy and let the person your giving the gift to choose what they want!

Fall Fruit

October 31, 2012

“Fall Fruit” ©Jill Rosoff 2012, 15″ x 15″

Its starting to really feel like Fall at last!  So it’s perfect to show off some Fall Fruit.  I actually did this piece a few years ago, I was playing with the idea of making a pattern for textiles, maybe wrapping paper, or wallpaper.  It was an experiment in using different colors than I typically would, especially the wonderful pomegranate red with the greens of the pears, the bay leaves and the tangerine leaves.  

Lately I’ve been teaching an introduction to watercolor techniques at the local junior college, which has been great fun, and I’m thrilled that the workshop has been picked up again for February.  But between that, preparing for and doing festivals and boutiques with my silk scarves, and my other watercolor workshops, I haven’t had the chance to complete paintings I’ve been working on to show you here.  I’ve got a few really fun ones going on though, many were started as demonstrations in the workshops, which I’ve been developing at the painting table later on.  So you’ll see those new pieces up here soon.  

By the way!  For those of you in Southern California, the next festival where I’m showing my hand-painted scarves is on November 11th in Long Beach, at the Patchwork Indie Arts & Crafts Show.  I’ll be doing a demonstration on how I paint my designs onto the silk, and also showing some scarf tying and knotting, too.  Come find me, I’m in Space #6, just opposite the food trucks!  AND I’ll be sharing the space with Susan Haldeman of LadyBIM, with her wonderful hand-embellished sachets, pillows, bamboo baby wear and more.   And we’ll be next to our friend Lucky Zelda to boot!  Hope we see you there!

  continued from Part 2, posted October 17 

While I was having such a grand time watching the painters as they were in the process of developing their painting, I was also looking around the painting studio.  You start noticing interesting things, given the time to sit and take the environment in:  the air ducts, the odd shape of the room, where the windows are, the flourescent lights, and how those two sources of light inform the visuals.  And some wonderfully mismatched socks. 

Aren’t these fun?  She might just be an artist!  

I took my first break after posing for about an hour.  I wanted to hold the pose for a long time, but was also really looking forward to seeing their paintings in progress.  After the placement of my limbs were marked so I’d be in the right position when I resumed the pose, I unfolded my tucked-in leg, stood up and stretched.  Then I walked around, talked to each painter, heard about what they did, both for a living and with their art, which sometimes dovetailed.  It turned out two of them are art teachers in the community college district.   And they allowed me to photograph their works too.  The versions I’m showing here were taken toward the end of the session, when the pieces were fairly well developed.  

So here are the works of the five artists, at least where they got them to at the end of the session.  After three hours, it’s a pretty fun collection.  Its an experience to see oneself painted or drawn in so many ways.  Each person’s individual view is so distinct, their palettes are so unique.  I hadn’t realized that I’d hand-painted silk scarves  of pink and orange poppies for the sitting.  

Pat’s painting of me in the pose she was so captivated by

 

Such a diverse result!  I especially loved how some incorporated my paintings that were hanging on the wall behind me, melding them into their compositions, or in my scarf, picking up the colors from me to the surroundings, five very distinct renditions.  I got very nostalgic for painting in a group, it was some of the most fun part of painting in school, seeing everyone’s version of the model and pose.   My great thanks to all the artists for having me come and pose, and for letting me show their works.  

The artist, next to my tulips painting (see the clipping of it over in the right-hand column, there).  Segment of painting in process, by Janet Logan

A little over a week ago, for my first time ever, I was the model for a small artist’s group.  This all came about when 2 friends, mother and daughter, came over for coffee in July.  I met Connie while at an former job, where one of my responsibilities was to schedule educational seminars for the members of the professional organization.  Connie worked for a company in New England that gave qualified educational seminars, which she brought to us and was the seminar presenter.  She came out a total of three times, over the years, but when she came to do the first one, she asked if her mom, who lived nearby, could come to see her give the seminar.  Her mom, Pat, turned out to be a painter too, and we immediately hit it off.  After I left that job, I lost contact with Connie, sadly.  Then a little over a year ago, Pat emailed me that Connie had an artist client for whom she was doing PR who was going to be a group show nearby here, and could I come to the opening?  And suddenly, happily, we were back in contact.  Thank goodness for the internet!  

So Pat and Connie came to visit, we were having a great conversation over cafe’ lattes, when Pat suddenly said she loved the way I was sitting on my couch, under one of my paintings, and would I consider modeling for this group she paints with? Long story short, we scheduled it, and it happened a week ago Thursday.  

In the emails confirming the date, Pat was so excited that I was going to pose for them.  She wrote, “You were just so elegant sitting in your space with your large painting behind, being so animated about your work.  So, if you could bring your couch and that large painting, that would be good.”  I howled as I shared this little gem with Connie.  Just so you know, the painting she was referring to is a very large piece, the paper is 40″ tall by 60″ wide.  Unframed.  But her enthusiasm was so fun and so sweet to hear, that I offered to bring one or two of my 22″ x 30″ pieces with me to hang on the wall behind me while I posed, if she wanted.  She was thrilled. 

So, here is where I was sitting when Pat and Connie came over:  my couch and the painting over it.  I was sitting on the right side of it, leaning on the arm of the couch, as you can see in the drawing up top, with my legs up on it, out to the side.  

And here is the set-up Pat had ready for me at their studio, with a futon approximating my couch, and two of my watercolors (obviously not as large, and much easier to transport) up on the wall behind.

Very similar!  And particularly easy, since I don’t have a bevy of nubian slaves that would be able to schlep my couch and painting onto my car, and to this painting studio.  Yet.

And here is Pat with her painting of my part-way through the session.  And yes, Pat is wearing one of my scarves that her daughter Connie had ordered from me for Pat’s birthday.  Doesn’t she look great in it!

More of my experience watching others paint while I model, and their paintings in the next posting.

Working with Fall Colors

September 11, 2012

“Leaf Study 1″ ©Jill Rosoff 2012, 6″ x 6”, watercolor on paper

I’ve been playing around with some of my typical palette and color combinations lately.  Its stemming from my designing with seasonally-related color combinations in my new designs on my silk scarves.  The palette of colors I regularly use lean more to the spring and summer spectrums.  Fall colors, the ones I grew up with, looked frankly dull and drab to me.  Now, of course the typical fall color palette is influenced by the colors of the leaves changing, truly, and the mums plants that were for sale back then were in yellow, gold, orange, rust, and the most incongruous color of a flower to me, brown.  Brown mums were just not at all attractive to me.  Rust-colored mums were a close second.

Since the scarves are more fashion than art related, I needed to bring fall color combinations into the scarves palettes, so I googled “‘fall colors 2012” and got listings for the official color predictions from all sorts of resources, but especially Pantone.  Here are 2012’s fall season palette of 10 colors:


This selection looks downright spring-like to me!  These are the colors of a tropical vacation, no?  It doesn’t scream “We Gather Together”, thats for sure!   The orange up there, top row, 2nd from the right, officially called Tangerine Tango, is the ‘color of the year’ for 2012.  Perfect for me, because I could call it Iceland Poppy Orange.  I’m dying to see what the official color will be for 2013.  Please oh please make it a good color for my flowers, oh Pantone color wizards!  I have to say, wouldn’t it be great to be a member of this board of people who get to decide colors for each season of each year?  That is a job I could really get into!  Imagine selecting color combinations for the use of the fashion and interiors industries!  No more beige!

Until that job offer comer through, I’ve decided to try and use this palette of colors in a painting or two.  And of course the scarves.  Its been a great exercise so far, it’s helped me step out of the comfort zone of my well-ingrained, go-to palette of colors.  

And so the painting up top is the first piece I came up with in what I hope is a long line of paintings and scarves using this new scheme of colors.  I hope you like it.  As a matter of fact, would you let me know please?  Use the “Leave a comment” link below!  Thanks!

The Leaf painting is now available for sale on my Etsy shop:  Rosoff Artworks.  Want to compare it to other paintings of mine, palette wise?  Scroll down and look at other paintings on this blog, or go to my  website and compare them to my larger-format paintings.

“Flower Fields” pattern, silk scarf ©Jill Rosoff 2011

Each year, the Visionary Women Circle of the Alzheimer’s Association honors Orange County caregivers who display extraordinary compassion in caring for those touched by Alzheimer’s disease and related forms of dementia.  At this year’s event, eight artists of different mediums will produce a piece of work on site during the Festival Shopping and Social hour, from 10:00am–11:00am preceding the luncheon.  Last month I got an invitation from the Alzheimer’s Association to be a part of this event.  

I am extremely pleased that I will be one of the eight artists, where I will demonstrate my silk painting process.  Each artisan will also give back to the organization by donating a piece for an opportunity drawing, as well as 20% of any sales.   So I will have a full selection of my original scarves available for sale, and will be happy to take orders as well.  

Tickets are still available for the luncheon, where actress Shirley Jones will be the guest speaker. To purchase a ticket, buy a table, or sponsor the event, visit the Alzheimer’s Association Visionary Women website.

You can also see more of my scarves in my Etsy Shop BloomingSilks.  Thank you!

“Still Life in Yellows” ©Jill Rosoff 2012  5 1/2″ x 8 1/2″

Today I set aside just to make art.  And I cooked a little too, which sort of counts, cooking is also about making something.  But primarily I worked on art, with “soundtrack” of the Olympics playing in the background.  No business, no marketing, just all drawing and painting.  

One of the things I did today is that I finished this small painting.  I started it in June as a demonstration in one of my workshops, I wanted to play with the idea of all the objects in the painting being variations of a single color, like a one note melody:  sing “Long Tall Sally” to yourself, see what I mean?   On this one day we had all these yellow objects that people had brought in to the workshop  to use as subjects for their paintings.  The idea literally presented itself, right there in front of me, to make a composition of the different colors of yellow.  So I blocked in the pepper, the lemons and the bananas.  Then I rendered them using glazes and dropping-in color, which is also referred to as ‘charging’ (ok, a vision of the battles in the movie ‘Braveheart’ just came to mind as I wrote that–this is the way my brain works).

I decided to complete it using versions of primary colors–there were the three yellows: rich warm, bright and cool, and a little lighter and muted, plus a warm violet as the blue for all the shadows and the background, and a diluted Winsor Red became a warm pink, which also turned orangy glazed over the yellow.  Oh and a bit of green for the pepper’s stem, and on the bananas.  The fun result is that even with those few colors, it’s a pretty rich palette.  

Its available for purchase on my Etsy shop.  

Back at it!

July 11, 2012

“Four Green Apples” ©Jill Rosoff 2012, 8 1/2″ x 5 1/2″

Things have been busy lately, at the expense my blog, although I’m not ignoring it on purpose!  I had a couple of big weekend shows, one was not so great, one was terrific – I love doing the Balboa Island Art Walk!  Those were followed up with post-show follow-up work.  Then I caught a bug that took two antibiotics and a couple of weeks to chase away.  Then I went on vacation –  to Hawaii for almost 2 weeks, primarily at a workshop learning to play slack key guitar, with a little bit of sunning, swimming and snorkeling.  And last week was the Fourth of  July.  Its taken me a little longer than expected to get back to business as usual!

So here I am, back at it.  This little watercolor was inspired by the shows I did–I have a pair of market umbrellas that are apple green that I use to shade my display, and I have green apples on my table for people to take, to carry out the theme.  I had a few apples left over after the Balboa show, so I took them to my watercolor workshop the next week  for my students to use as subjects for their paintings.  This piece started as my demonstration, about using a flat wash to make the apple shapes and the shadows.  For the shadowing on the apples I used magenta in both glazing and dropping in of the color to a water wash.  The yellow striped table cloth was a great juxtaposition of color to set off the green and magenta.  The stems are alizarine crimson, which becomes brownish when layered on the green of the apples.  Its available through my Etsy shop now!

Blueberries

August 8, 2011


“Blueberries I” ©Jill Rosoff 2011, 5 1/2″ x 8 1/2″,  SOLD

It’s always a great moment when I find something new I want to paint.  A few months ago it was a nasturtium that one of my workshop students brought in to paint.  See the April 21st posting.  This new subject matter, blueberries, started manifesting itself earlier this year.

There was actually a trio of attention-grabbers that all occurred in April.  First, I began noticing photos of blueberries in magazines and online.  You know when you buy a new car and you begin to see scads of them on the road?  Like that.  hmmm.  It must be blueberry season!

Next, there was a posting on Facebook that April 28th was National Blueberry Pie Day.  Whoever got that holiday up and running was genius.  Of all the lovely things to celebrate.  Pres. Reagan had the third Sunday in July declared National Ice Cream Day — did you all celebrate that??  My grandmother loved to cook for her family, and though her enthusiasm wasn’t always matched with success, she did make great pies.  Just three flavors, though, and one of them was her ‘Blubry’ pie.

The third thing that happened was a call from someone to collaborate on a project, and one of the subjects they were interested was blueberries.

Common wisdom says that things come in threes.  Best not to ignore it.  And I didn’t, though this painting took its sweet time coming to fruition.  Four months down the road, here it is. 

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