continued from Part 2, posted October 17 

While I was having such a grand time watching the painters as they were in the process of developing their painting, I was also looking around the painting studio.  You start noticing interesting things, given the time to sit and take the environment in:  the air ducts, the odd shape of the room, where the windows are, the flourescent lights, and how those two sources of light inform the visuals.  And some wonderfully mismatched socks. 

Aren’t these fun?  She might just be an artist!  

I took my first break after posing for about an hour.  I wanted to hold the pose for a long time, but was also really looking forward to seeing their paintings in progress.  After the placement of my limbs were marked so I’d be in the right position when I resumed the pose, I unfolded my tucked-in leg, stood up and stretched.  Then I walked around, talked to each painter, heard about what they did, both for a living and with their art, which sometimes dovetailed.  It turned out two of them are art teachers in the community college district.   And they allowed me to photograph their works too.  The versions I’m showing here were taken toward the end of the session, when the pieces were fairly well developed.  

So here are the works of the five artists, at least where they got them to at the end of the session.  After three hours, it’s a pretty fun collection.  Its an experience to see oneself painted or drawn in so many ways.  Each person’s individual view is so distinct, their palettes are so unique.  I hadn’t realized that I’d hand-painted silk scarves  of pink and orange poppies for the sitting.  

Pat’s painting of me in the pose she was so captivated by

 

Such a diverse result!  I especially loved how some incorporated my paintings that were hanging on the wall behind me, melding them into their compositions, or in my scarf, picking up the colors from me to the surroundings, five very distinct renditions.  I got very nostalgic for painting in a group, it was some of the most fun part of painting in school, seeing everyone’s version of the model and pose.   My great thanks to all the artists for having me come and pose, and for letting me show their works.  

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The artist, next to my tulips painting (see the clipping of it over in the right-hand column, there).  Segment of painting in process, by Janet Logan

A little over a week ago, for my first time ever, I was the model for a small artist’s group.  This all came about when 2 friends, mother and daughter, came over for coffee in July.  I met Connie while at an former job, where one of my responsibilities was to schedule educational seminars for the members of the professional organization.  Connie worked for a company in New England that gave qualified educational seminars, which she brought to us and was the seminar presenter.  She came out a total of three times, over the years, but when she came to do the first one, she asked if her mom, who lived nearby, could come to see her give the seminar.  Her mom, Pat, turned out to be a painter too, and we immediately hit it off.  After I left that job, I lost contact with Connie, sadly.  Then a little over a year ago, Pat emailed me that Connie had an artist client for whom she was doing PR who was going to be a group show nearby here, and could I come to the opening?  And suddenly, happily, we were back in contact.  Thank goodness for the internet!  

So Pat and Connie came to visit, we were having a great conversation over cafe’ lattes, when Pat suddenly said she loved the way I was sitting on my couch, under one of my paintings, and would I consider modeling for this group she paints with? Long story short, we scheduled it, and it happened a week ago Thursday.  

In the emails confirming the date, Pat was so excited that I was going to pose for them.  She wrote, “You were just so elegant sitting in your space with your large painting behind, being so animated about your work.  So, if you could bring your couch and that large painting, that would be good.”  I howled as I shared this little gem with Connie.  Just so you know, the painting she was referring to is a very large piece, the paper is 40″ tall by 60″ wide.  Unframed.  But her enthusiasm was so fun and so sweet to hear, that I offered to bring one or two of my 22″ x 30″ pieces with me to hang on the wall behind me while I posed, if she wanted.  She was thrilled. 

So, here is where I was sitting when Pat and Connie came over:  my couch and the painting over it.  I was sitting on the right side of it, leaning on the arm of the couch, as you can see in the drawing up top, with my legs up on it, out to the side.  

And here is the set-up Pat had ready for me at their studio, with a futon approximating my couch, and two of my watercolors (obviously not as large, and much easier to transport) up on the wall behind.

Very similar!  And particularly easy, since I don’t have a bevy of nubian slaves that would be able to schlep my couch and painting onto my car, and to this painting studio.  Yet.

And here is Pat with her painting of my part-way through the session.  And yes, Pat is wearing one of my scarves that her daughter Connie had ordered from me for Pat’s birthday.  Doesn’t she look great in it!

More of my experience watching others paint while I model, and their paintings in the next posting.

“Red Tulips”, ©Jill Rosoff 2012, 15″ x 11″

I’ve had bouquets of daffodils, tulips and sweet peas in the house a lot lately. Its spring! and they’re really affordable now at Trader Joe’s.  And REALLY affordable from my sister’s garden–she has a wonderful huge crop of sweet peas along the fence in her yard.  The flowers have been my live ‘models’ for both for my paintings and my scarves, and I take them to my workshops for my students to use as subject matter for their paintings.  I’ve while I’ve got a couple of paintings of daffodils nearing completion, but here’s my most recent watercolor of red tulips.  I love these pieces, just the red of the flowers, on the white background, punctuated by the black stamens in the centers of the blossoms.

Tulips were some of my ‘teachers’ in watercolors.  On a trip in Europe toward the end of college, I bought some bulbs in Amsterdam which were sent to me when it was time to plant them.  In the spring, voila, I had some lovely tulips in my garden, and sat outside trying to get them down in watercolor.  I was painting exclusively with oils at the time, and watercolors are nothing like oils to paint with.  So I practiced with the watercolors, trying to figure out how to use them, as often as I could as long as those tulips were blooming in my garden, just about 2 weeks.  I tried to get those watercolor paints to behave.  Ultimately I learned to surrender to them, which is usually the case, isn’t it?  So this painting is my most recent visit to an old friend and teacher.  

The other fun things?  I’m getting ready to show this coming Sunday, May 20th at the 18th Annual Balboa Island Art Walk.  I really enjoy this show, partly because its on the bayfront of Newport Harbor, which is beautiful, but also because at this show is along a walkway thats about 8′ wide, so our displays are flat along the walkway.  You can walk right up to the artwork, there’s no intimidation factor of having to enter into a 10′ tent.  Click here for more information about the Artwalk.  I’ll be between Coral and Apolena streets, just look for my apple-green umbrellas!

And I’ve got all sorts of new scarves!    I’ll have them at the Artwalk, and they are also available through my new Etsy Shop, “Blooming Silks”.  Please visit soon!

The interior of a tulip

April 7, 2011

“Another Red Tulip” ©Jill Rosoff 2011, 4″ x 6″, $40.00

When you think of the image of a tulip, the shape that comes to mind is the shape of the whole flower atop that lovely long stem.  When the blossom opens up wide like this, which they’ll do when it’s warm, it shows off these wonderful inner glories.  How coy of them to have all this great-looking stuff hidden inside!  They almost look like poppies when they’re like this.  The fun thing is that when it cools off, the buds close up again.

This piece is painted on the last sheet of paper from the pack of watercolor postcard blanks I bought so many years ago.  I mentioned that pad two posts ago, on “Single Orange Tulip”.  Imagine what all of these tulip portraits would look like arranged together on the wall!  the orange , the pink, the two red ones, and there’s a purple one posted back on March 28, 2009.


New Crop of Tulips

March 25, 2011

“Single Orange Tulip”  ©Jill Rosoff 2011, 4″ x 6″  $40.00

I like the idea of a “portrait” of a flower.  This series came about because of a couple of influences: one, I love tulips, if you hadn’t gotten that yet, and they’re in season. The other is that years ago I bought this little pad of watercolor paper that’s postcard sized.    I thought at one point how fun it would be to paint a quick sketch of something while on vacation, and mail it off as a postcard.  I’ve done a few little pieces over the years, but never mailed them. There are actually markings on the back of each piece of paper for where to put the stamp.  That pad has been in my supply rack for years, so I decided to use the pad up, by painting one flower bud on each one.  The pink tulip last month was the first.  There are two more to come, then the pad is kaput.  Got to break out some new paper, my freesias are blooming.

“Daffodils on Coral” ©Jill Rosoff 2010, 10″ x 6″, SOLD 

Its coming up on daffodil season.  There were cut bunches in Trader Joe’s this week.  Spring is just 2 months away!

Using flowers as they grow through each season, so daffodils and tulips round about now, has in some ways become an exploration of new color schemes.  It works in a kind of nifty way, the subject matter changes month to month.  Daffodils start to bloom in mid-winter, when its dull and often gloomy as the earth lies fallow as it reinvigorates itself.  In that bleakness, suddenly bright spots of yellows spring up, the long, finger-like leaves first emerge from of the bulb, break through the ground, and then the bud comes, and then the bloom.   And wow, there’s that yellow.

Do you recall that amazing visual in Dr. Zhivago where you knew the freezing winter was ending because the daffodils had sprung up?  That ‘s the feeling.

“Seven Pale Pink Tulips” ©Jill Rosoff 2010, 17 1/2″ x 6″  $145.00

It’s bulb-planting season, and its certainly been cold enough lately here, almost as cold as it’s supposed to be according to the Dutch.  I planted bulbs years ago when I lived in Berkeley, and I’m glad that I tried it, went through the whole process, and thoroughly enjoyed keeping vigil until  the plants popped out of the ground, and then watching as they bloomed  into those long, lovely, statuesque flowers.  I marvel at those who plant and nurture their bulbs every year in SoCal.

I did a painting similar to this one earlier this year, but the one just wasn’t enough.  I felt the need to explore more the shapes of the flowers and the leaves, the colors, and how those elements work in the long, narrow format of the paper.

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